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  • What does a programming poser look like?

    There are a lot of technology amateurs out there posing as experts. How can tell what a technology/programming poser looks like?

    Gets excited about technology and ignores results. A true professional knows that technology is only a means to an end, not the end itself. But lots of posers get caught up in the "coolness factor". Unfortunately, many "cool" things will not improve your business. Posers don't understand this.

    Undirected troubleshooting. I once worked with a consultant who would try to randomly change things when she ran into a technical problem. A poser doesn’t understand the technology he/she is working ...

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  • Reason #534 to Not Bill Hourly

    Noted author Steve McConnell discusses the various studies that show huge variations (10:1 or more) in the productivity of different programmers with the same levels of experience. Many of us in the industry have experienced this first hand - watching the destruction of a project budget by an individual who burned hours at an alarming rate with little to show for it.

    But doesn't billing on an hourly basis just compound this problem? We are rewarding the individual who is least productive by paying him the most. It certainly gives the developer no incentive to work efficiently.

    Most clients haven't heard ...

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  • Keep it under control

    I'm often amazed at the number of developers who don't use source code control software. The arguments I've heard against it are lame and half hearted:

    Too expensive

    Other than some time to set it up and the disk space to set aside for it, there is no reason for it to cost anything at all. There are several source code control options that are open source or free. (Some examples include Subversion and CVS.) Personally, I use Sourcegear's Vault, which is free for a single user.

    Only large teams need source code control

    Even teams of one person can benefit ...

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  • What you should know about consultants

    Esther Schindler has written an excellent piece at CIO.com on things CIOs (and others) should know about working with consultants and contractors. I particularly liked this:

    Statements of work are necessary elements, particularly in project definition and negotiation. However, points out Terrence Gargiulo, president of MakingStories.net, statements of work should be treated as living, breathing, evolving documents that reflect a collaborative relationship between the consultant and client. Otherwise, he cautions, "Projects can too easily turn into an 'us versus them' dynamic in which no one wins."

    This is an important point. Both the consultant and the customer need to ...

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What the critics are saying...

Avonelle is a talented expert in her field. She has blended well with our team and built applications that we are proud to deploy to our associates. Her talents helped us execute a vision expediently and with quality. If we could do it all over again, we wouldn’t change a thing.

Peter Edstrom @ Renewal by Andersen